Liberia

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Justice for Liberia: The Way Forward After Historic Verdict and 30-Year Sentence

Mohammed Jabbateh, the Liberian warlord
Tuesday, April 24, 2018 - 20:36

On 19 April 2018, Mohammed Jabbateh, the Liberian warlord known as “Jungle Jabbah”, was sentenced to 30 years in prison in Philadelphia, the culmination of a landmark case in the United States and marking a long-overdue milestone for justice in Liberia. What are the next steps in the Liberian Quest for Justice?

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Anonymous
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My Fellow Liberians: accountability is needed now more than ever

Ken Harper - Together Liberia
Saturday, March 10, 2018 - 16:21

In 2017, for the first time in history, voices of victims of the first Liberian civil war were heard in the criminal trial of Mohammed Jabbateh, aka Jungle Jabbah, a former Liberian warlord residing in Philadelphia USA. The Jabbateh trial showed that justice can be achieved without violence and it raised hope for thousands of Liberians. But the lack of accountability for grave crimes is an obstacle to peace and stability, and a potential cause for future conflict that must be addressed adequately. Now more than ever we need to make sure that Liberians are well-informed of the trials coming up outside the country.

Anonymous
Sheikh Siaka Kromah

Thank you for this great initiative. We have been advocating for this day to come wherein people with account for their crime, so that Justice can prevail in this country. The will be no lasting peace without Justice.

But I advice, you guys must try to have private security for own safety. If not, your life with be in danger. These guys can do anything ...

Friday, February 16, 2018 - 03:51
Anonymous
Clara waye Howard

Thanks so much I in line with you my husband was flogged December 27 2013 n the Liberian gov said they can't bring un to book. My husband worked with unmil at that time plz can we get to talk to you he's Dominic Howard

Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 09:58
Anonymous
tubman k. snawolo

What About the lutheran Church massacare which was one of the first in liberia ?so bakadu is so important to You b/c of Your People.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 07:42
Anonymous
Alexander Kla B...

Thank you so much, we met few years back when I used to worked as cafe attendant at Logan Town Market junction.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 07:35
Anonymous
Lusene Sirleaf

Great to pursue justice in Liberia. and I believe justice will hunt perpetrators atrocities during Liberian civil wars. I just want to understand what you are doing to document the atrocious massacre in Barkedu, Lofa County; I hope the voices of Barkedu's victims must also be heard through your efforts

Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 17:29
Anonymous
Lusene Sirleaf

Great to pursue justice in Liberia. and I believe justice will hunt perpetrators atrocities during Liberian civil wars. I just want to understand what you are doing to document the atrocious massacre in Barkedu, Lofa County; I hope the voices of Barkedu's victims must also be heard through your efforts

Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 17:28
Anonymous
Abdul Ayoub Swaray

This is a great initiative. The perpetrator of war crimes must be brought to justice. Is really becoming a customery thing in Liberia to reward world's most notorious criminals with public offices. In a country where the illiterates are more then the literate, the decision making last in the hands of the majority. This is one of the greatest problem in the liberian society. I personally support any international establishment of justice system that will serve justice to all Liberian. If we as Liberian can not establish a court to bring notorious criminals to justice, then we support any external establishment as long as justice will be served to our people. One again thank so much for this great initiative.

Monday, February 12, 2018 - 14:14
Anonymous
Abdul Ayoub Swaray

What becomes of those world's notorious criminal occupying public offices here in Liberia.

Monday, February 12, 2018 - 13:58
Anonymous
Francis Egu Lansana

Justice served as a roof that provides sustainability for the promotion of peace; its also served as a light that brightening the road to democracy. Now it's not about your previous role during the civil war but now it about taking the responsibility in making sure that guinee justice is serve. There must be a precedent to avoid tthe reoccurrence of the past. Don't be ashamed or afraid when you are associated with your past especially what you did consciously and boastfully.

Monday, February 12, 2018 - 12:38
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Anonymous
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