Justice Insight

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"The dialogue on international justice needs to become more diverse and global"

International Impartial and Independent Mechanism
Sunday, December 16, 2018 - 08:50

The 20th anniversary summer session of Salzburg Law School on International Criminal Law, Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law (SLS) brought together a diverse group of students, academics and practicioners. But experts like Professor Suzannah Linton also believe “the dialogue on international justice needs to become more diverse and global.” Salzburg Law School started its first summer school 20 years ago, and held its last one just as the International Criminal Court celebrates 20 years since it was founded via the Rome Statute. One of the organisers looks back at the event in Salzburg and forwards to ask participants what needs to happen to "revitalise the international justice project".

Anonymous
David D Y Choi

from David D Y Choi, who is ; repairing used rotten bike from recycling lot, to go around, due to income lessness status. ====

Under the Sky, One should be equal as long as Human Being. Underprivileged social class, Before the birth, even after the death, this underprivileged group should follow the pre-framed given route. Upon realizing that crossing the given route is limited, its trial object would be named as ‘Betrayer’ or targeted as ‘Gov. Sanction’. Extending of this status, urged and resulted let David create hand written images between # 1 and # 58. Still, there, no one, no response, no way to get out, its condition is extended. Its uselessness, barren condition has been extended as usual. David D Y Choi , November 2018 ( e-mail ; [email protected], or [email protected] ) Personal URL : http://www.cdyera.wordpress.com ( at URL, on the bottom site, linked images are available )

Thursday, November 15, 2018 - 04:53
Anonymous
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Rome Statute drafter: No one at the time thought we would have a functioning ICC in only 20 years

Judges of the International Criminal Court
Sunday, November 25, 2018 - 13:41

There are many summer schools that bring together students and academics. Salzburg Law School started its first summer school 20 years ago, and held its last one just as the International Criminal Court celebrates 20 years since it was founded via the Rome Statute. One of the organisers looks back at the event in Salzburg and forwards to ask participants what needs to happen to "revitalise the international justice project"?

Anonymous
David D Y Choi

Under the Sky, One should be equal as long as Human Being. Underprivileged social class, Before the birth, even after the death, this underprivileged group should follow the pre-framed given route. Upon realizing that crossing the given route is limited, its trial object would be named as ‘Betrayer’ or targeted as ‘Gov. Sanction’. Extending of this status, urged and resulted let David create hand written images between # 1 and # 58. Still, there, no one, no response, no way to get out, its condition is extended. Its uselessness, barren condition has been extended as usual. David D Y Choi , September 2018 ( e-mail ; [email protected], or [email protected] ) Personal URL : http://www.cdyera.wordpress.com ( at URL, on the bottom site, linked images are available )

Saturday, September 29, 2018 - 05:04
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“The Men Who Killed Me” 2.0 project: Understanding sexual violence in conflict and empowering its survivors 

Candles for Rwanda
Sunday, November 4, 2018 - 11:02

Ten years ago, the book “The Men Who Killed Me” was published.  It gave 17 of the survivors of sexual crimes during the genocide in Rwanda (16 women and one man) a stage upon which they could share their photos, harrowing experiences and narrative with the world. Now, in light of the upcoming 25th commemoration of the genocide in 2019, it is the survivors’ wish to put forth an updated edition of the book to show how their lives have unfolded in the past decade. 

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Gambia’s search for the truth

President Adama Barrow takes a group picture with Reconciliation and Reparations Commission (TRRC) members
Friday, October 26, 2018 - 10:56

What does the launch of Gambia's new Truth, Reconciliation and Reparations Commission mean to the next generation? Gambian children used drama to tell stories about their expectations of the transitional justice process in the West African country.

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Timothy

Thank you for sharing this.

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 19:27
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A legal path to justice emerges for Myanmar

Rohingya refugees in refugee camp in Bangladesh, 2017.jpg
Monday, October 8, 2018 - 15:33

The UN Human Rights Council in Geneva voted in September 2018 for the establishment of an evidence-gathering mechanism to provide accountability for gross human rights violations in Myanmar. Sean Bain of the International Commission of Jurists argues that this can complement existing or potential national and international justice systems, be that of the ICC, foreign courts with jurisdiction, or later in Myanmar, or a mix of these options. He says this is an important foundation for effective accountability which deserves support.

Anonymous
David D Y Choi

Under the Sky, One should be equal as long as Human Being. Underprivileged social class, Before the birth, even after the death, this underprivileged group should follow the pre-framed given route. Upon realizing that crossing the given route is limited, its trial object would be named as ‘Betrayer’ or targeted as ‘Gov. Sanction’. Extending of this status, urged and resulted let David create hand written images between # 1 and # 58. Still, there, no one, no response, no way to get out, its condition is extended. Its uselessness, barren condition has been extended as usual. David D Y Choi , October 2018 ( e-mail ; [email protected], or [email protected] ) Personal URL : http://www.cdyera.wordpress.com ( at URL, on the bottom site, linked images are available )

Saturday, October 13, 2018 - 08:55
Anonymous
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Three proposals to keep South Africa in the International Criminal Court

Jacob Zuma
Thursday, November 24, 2016 - 12:37

The clock is ticking. In just about eleven and a half months, South Africa is set to officially withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC). Here at the Assembly of States Parties (ASP), though, the overall feeling is optimistic.

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Peter Sabiiti

I don't find a point in the article. Where are the three reasons??? Africa because of selective application of the ICC's version of Justice. Let it first issue a warrant of arrest against Blair and Bush, that's when we shall know that it can bite.

Sunday, November 27, 2016 - 10:50
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Five Thoughts on South Africa, Burundi, and ICC Withdrawals

President Omar al-Bashir and President Jacob Zuma
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 - 15:45

Contrary to the suggestion of some, the dust on South Africa’s and Burundi’s withdrawal from the International Criminal Court (ICC) has not settled. It won't for some time. These two withdrawals have sparked an intense debate on the future of the ICC. Many observers have already provided cogent commentary since South Africa deposited its notice of withdrawal to the United Nations Secretary General. In this post, I want to offer and add a few thoughts on what South Africa’s and Burundi’s decisions mean.

Anonymous
B.A. Wabala

While it's right for Africa to push for reform in the World's Court tht seems to be stuck in the post world war 2 , it's important also to view the consequences of the withdrawal to the African people, whose rights have been violated and yet to be gravely violated. It's undoubtedly true that Both the ICC prosecution's office as well as The Security Council are biased, precisely failing to act on Syria situation. It's clear to everyone that there are bullies. The untouchable... but then let us evaluate the situation here at home. There are serious problems. We cannot deny that and the existence of a problem elsewhere doesn't mean we have none here at home. The reasons that made African countries sign for the Rome Statute haven't changed. It's only that African leaders want to prepare a platform to perpetrate illegality with impunity. After all that's what is reigning supreme in Africa. Sudan, Ivory Cost, South Sudan you name it... For the sake of the victims. And from there perspective eyes... let's not move out.

Saturday, October 29, 2016 - 10:21
Anonymous
Lury Nkouessom

I am not a fan of the ICC and international justice in general. The double standard is so obvious in those. The concept of international justice in itself is laudavke but in practuce it's selectiveness defeats its promise. Powrful countries such as the US and India are not members of the ICC, yet we have seen the US calling on people to be prosecuted by the Court. The court has been unable to bring western countries to book for their international crimes. That is in and of itself a stain on its legacy thus far. Some people argue that the ICC does not specifically target African countries but instead those African countries are the ones inviting the court's investigatikn and prosecution. While this is true in principle, in practice though, those african countries inviting the court do so more often to gain political clout over their opponents. It is the justice of the victors. This us what happened in the Ivory Coast for example. None of president Ouattara political allies were targetted by the ICC although clearly atrocities were committed on both sides. African countries who remain in the ICC only do so because eventually they will need the ICC as a political tool to pressure and witch-hunt their political opponents. I think it is about time all African countries withdraw from that court until some serious reforms are carried out.

Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 10:19
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Burundi’s Awkward — and Mostly Pointless — Farewell to the ICC

Courtside Justice with Mark Kersten
Saturday, October 15, 2016 - 10:31

A government led by a President accused of mass human rights violations and crimes against humanity is seeking to end its relationship with the International Criminal Court (ICC). His plan, however is likely to backfire. Nkurunziza and his henchmen cannot escape ICC justice, even if they do withdraw.

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Mutiibwa hakim Saturday, October 22, 2016 - 18:36
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Peter Sabiiti

While impunity, human rights violations and crimes against humanity must never be condoned, the ICC must dispense justice and be seen to dispense it all over the world without fear or favour. NATO bombs Libya and destroy it, USA destroys Iraq and its people, Israel kills anyone they wish to kill in Palestine and elsewhere but the ICC looks on!! There's no human life that's more important than the other. How I wish all Africans could refuse to cooperate with that biased and ill-intentioned kangaroo court.

Thursday, October 20, 2016 - 18:14
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The International Criminal Court’s turn to the symbolic

Courtside Justice with Mark Kersten
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 - 14:34

You don’t have to be a critic of the International Criminal Court (ICC) to accept that its first fifteen years have been rough. The institution’s ability to deliver on its mandate of ending impunity for war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide hasn’t gone according to plan. Not even close. Now, it seems, the Court is trying a different tack.

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There is no system of international justice against Africa because there is no system of international justice

Courtside Justice with Mark Kersten
Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 12:25

Following the twenty-seventh African Union summit, it seems brighter days may lie ahead for the tumultuous relationship between African states and the International Criminal Court (ICC). In the wake of the summit, which took place earlier this month in Kigali, Rwanda, numerous reports suggested that African states stood up in support of the ICC and actively prevented the issue of a mass, Africa-wide withdrawal from the ICC landing on the official agenda of the gathered African heads of state.

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